MotherTongues: Wear Words, Celebrate Cultures

about words, languages, cultures, travel

For the love of travel May 10, 2012

Filed under: Culture,Travel — Michelle @ 7:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

I love travel. I know I say it (too) often, but it is such a part of who I am. We’re nurturing this love in our kids too. This summer, we will be going to South Africa to spend time with our family. We are also planning one week in Botswana – I can’t wait to see the Okavango Delta – and we are watching videos about Botswana together to prepare for our visit.

The photo above was taken in San Cristóbal de las Casas, in Chiapas, Mexico, when we lived there in 2010 and attended a language school. The woman was carrying a heavy load, and I sensed she has a hard life, one we can’t even imagine.

When traveling, I love to eat the local food. New foods, new flavors, new smells: it all adds up to a “new way of seeing things” for me. And I love it.

What do you love about travel?

Advertisements
 

Mushrooming in Italy July 6, 2011

Filed under: Greener lifestyle,Travel — Michelle @ 10:03 am
Tags: , , , ,

Image: Christian Meyn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I recently went hiking in Italy with my mom and sisters. Part of the fun for me, other than spending time with my family who I don’t see very often since we live on different continents, was learning some new things about life in Italy.

We walked past lots of mushrooms, and I learnt that you need to have a license to pick mushrooms. In some areas, you can get the license only once you attended a basic course and passed a test. Each region has its own regulations, and also its own picking calendar (days when mushroom picking is allowed), as well as the quantity of mushrooms allowed per person (usually 3kg per person per day). Placing the mushrooms in bags is illegal: you must use wicker-type baskets for collection to ensure that the mushroom spores are distributed as you walk through the woods.

Each year about 40,000 people suffer mushroom poisoning in Italy, so it is very important to be 100% sure your mushrooms are edible. In Italy, you can take your wild picked mushrooms to the local pharmacist or doctor who will identify them free of charge. Our Italian guide for our hike, told us that if you don’t take your mushrooms to the pharmacy and your guests die from mushroom poisoning, you can get tried for manslaughter! Definitely an incentive to make sure about your mushroom’s identity!

Wild mushrooms are the main ingredient in fettuccine ai funghi – some form of which are on many local menus in the Italian Alps. I can definitely recommend trying it!

 

 
%d bloggers like this: